©2009 Le Madison, @ W139 Amsterdam
(Foto: Simon Wald-Lasowski; the film set (black&white grid) is part of the exhibition
Belvedere by Bernd Trasberger.



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Remake: Le Madison
A/NL 2008/11, PAL 16:9, 50 min, colour, stereo
3 channel projection



© Video stills Remake: Le Madison


Performers: Luc van Esch, Tashi Iwaoka, Sarah van Lamsweerde
Cameras/Dancing lessons: Krzysztof Wegiel, Julias Willms
Cameras/Shooting: Alex Ivanov, Assen Ivanov, Svebor Kranjc, Krzysztof Wegiel, Julias Willms
Light setting: Paul Schimmel
Audio recording: Alvin van Veen
Audio mastering: Martin Siewert
Live music: Westhell5, www.westhell.nl
Exhibition setting: Exhibition Belvedere @ W139 by Bernd Trasberger
Thanks to: Miriam Bajtala, Andrea Bozic, Gijs Frieling, Wolfgang Oblasser, Rudi Palme, Sabien Schütte, Marleen van der Weerd, Julia Willms, Annette Wolfsberger
Special thanks to all participants!


The video installation Remake: Le Madison presents the live recording of the performance Le Madison on July 1st, 2009 at Kunstraum W139 in Amsterdam. For this intervention, participants responded to a call in newspapers and on the internet to perform a group dance at the art institution W139. The dancing steps could be rehearsed with YouTube Lectures (Le Madison Lessons 1 - 3) ahead of the performance. The collaborative dance project was recorded by multiple cameras and will be screened in Remake: Le Madison in a 3-channel-projection. (school)


© Exhibition view: I can't stand the quiet!, Tiroler Landesmuseum Ferdinandeum,
Innsbruck, 2011. Photo: WEST.Fotostudio






Le Madison
Art intervention on July 1st 2009, W139, Amsterdam

The Madison is the name of a line dance that came to Europe from the USA at the beginning of the 1960s, spread chiefly via film. The dance consists of a predetermined combination of steps by dancers who move without touching each other while standing alongside one another in a line—coolness gone Swing, so to speak.
Annja Krautgasser’s adaptation of the Madison theme is an allusion to a famous scene in the 1964 film Bande à part (Band of Outsiders) by Jean-Luc Godard, and so also to the medium responsible for the dance’s popularity in Europe in the early 1960s. In the scene concerned, one of the key scenes of the film, the three main characters Odile, Franz, and Arthur break into the Madison in a Paris bistro as if they were the only people there.

The isolation as a group within the social corpus that they also experience as outsiders is expressed in the particular form of the Madison: as a line dance it is carried out by several participants at the same time, although each person involved does so in isolation and not with a partner as a direct counterpart.
The venue for Annja Krautgasser’s remake of the scene is an Amsterdam art space that provides the institutional framework of a white cube characterised by the then current intervention The Cartesian Grid by the artist Bernd Trasberger. In this work, the neutrality of the art space is exaggerated by a rational white grid while also being broken to the extent that Trasberger also introduced items from older art projects to allude to social utopianism. So Krautgasser’s intervention also contains utopian potential when the venue for her project is a context that is both abstract and occupied by concrete utopian ideas. Le Madison was performed with a live band and with about forty dancers who had answered an online call for participants and studied the steps in advance. In contrast to the original film scene, it was the collective experience and shared knowledge about and in the dance that were in the foreground. In performing the re-enactment, there is a shift in the approach as it opens up towards a larger social context, so suggesting the symbolic opening up of an art space—i.e. to a form of institutional critique.

It is less of a direct political message of the kind seen in Adrian Piper’s Funk Lessons, 1982, where the artist showed a white audience how to dance to Afro-American funk music to redirect racist prejudice into cultural understanding. The intention shifts in Krautgasser’s piece more onto a level of (self-) reflection to the extent that here the authorship and the role of the artist are posited by an implicit adoption of distance.
(Patricia Grzonka)






Supported by:

Stichting {agentur:}
www.agentur.nl

newdancestudios
www.newdancestudios.com

W139, Warmoesstraat 139, 1012JB Amsterdam
www.w139.nl